DIY Bath Bombs

DIY

Learn how to DIY Bath Bombs easy with this step-by-step tutorial. You’ll be enjoying a relaxing bath in no time!

Though I don’t do it nearly often enough, one of my favorite ways to decompress after a long week (or sometimes a long day) is to pour a glass of wine, light some candles, and hop into the tub. To make the experience even more special, I toss one of these DIY bath bombs into the water. The fizzy bubbles, essentials oils, and beneficial minerals are a treat for the senses.

Homemade DIY Bath Bombs easy tutorial. #bath #bombs #spa

Today, I’m going to show you how you can create your own custom DIY Bath Bombs at home. If you’re anything like me, maybe having these on hand will encourage you to decompress a bit more frequently.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

In an effort to bring some relaxation into my home and create a spa-like experience whenever I needed it, I decided to make my own DIY Bath Bombs.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

Now, if you’re feeling intimidated by this process, don’t be. These bath bombs are so simple to make and really easy to customize. Let me show you.



First, gather all of your ingredients. I found everything online and linked things up below to make it easy for you. (This post contains affiliate links.)

Homemade Bath Bombs Shopping List:

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

How Do you Make DIY Bath Bombs?

Begin by measuring out and whisking together your dry ingredients in a large bowl. I used a coloring pigment for my diy bath bombs. Since it’s a dry pigment, you’ll want to include that in this step. Add as little or as much as you’d like to achieve the color you prefer.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

Next, in a small cup, mix together the wet ingredients. This is also where you’ll add the essential oils. You can get essential oils almost anywhere these days. I recommend shopping for these in person so you can find a scent you like. My favorite oils come from Young Living.

Also, pay attention to the benefit each oil offers. I made three different varieties. The purple bath bomb has an oil for stress relief, the blue prompts sleep, and the yellow promotes joy.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

The next step is very important. You need to add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. You’ll want to do this very slowly, adding little drops at a time while mixing.

The citric acid is what causes the bath bombs to fizz when it comes into contact with water. Adding the wet ingredients slowly minimizes this affect, allowing you to create the ball.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

Once mixed, you’re ready to mold. I picked up these bath bomb molds to create a ball shape. However, you can use things like a cupcake pan or silicon mold to achieve different shapes and sizes.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

For this round mold, fill each half, packing it in slightly until it’s overflowing. Then, firmly press the halves together. Let the mold sit for one minute. Once set, tap the mold and pull it apart.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

You’ll want to let the bath bombs dry for at least 24 hours before you create your own mini spa in your tub.

It’s that easy!

How long do Homemade Bath Bombs Last?

I’d say you’d want to use these DIY Bath bomb within about 6 months.

I liked to keep mine stored in a moisture-free clear glass jar.

DIY Bath Bombs

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

If you like this DIY project, you may enjoy these too:

DIY Bath Bomb Tutorial

If you have yet to make or even experience a bath bomb, I definitely recommend giving it a try.

What I really love about making these DIY bath bombs at home is that you can customize the oils and colors to create the best experience for you. Whether you want to relax, sleep more easily, or feel inspired, just changing a few things will help you achieve the mood you’re after.

DIY Bath Bombs | inspiredbycharm.com

These DIY bath bombs also make a great gift. Wrap up a few with a bottle of wine and a couple candles for the ultimate treat.

DIY Bath Bomb Recipe:

Servings: 4 bath bombs
Learn how to DIY Bath Bombs easy with this step-by-step tutorial. You'll be enjoying a relaxing bath in no time!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup citric acid
  • 1/2 cup epsom salt
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • coloring pigment - optional
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons almond oil - or melted coconut oil
  • 3/4 tablespoon water
  • 12-15 drops essential oil
  • Bath bomb molds

Instructions

  • In a medium bowl, mix together all of the dry ingredients. Add as much or as little color pigment to achieve desired look. Whisk to combine.
  • In a separate small bowl, mix together the wet ingredients.
  • Add the wet ingredients to the dry ones very slowly. (This is very important; otherwise you will activate the citric acid which is used to create the fizzing affect.) Mix until combined, and the ingredients look like wet sand.
  • Fill each half of the mold, packing the mixture in slightly until it's overflowing. Press the halves together firmly. Let the filled mold sit for one minute. Lightly tap the mold and gently pull it apart to remove the bath bomb. Let the bath bombs dry for 24 hours before enjoying in the tub.

Made it? Share it!Tag @inspiredbycharm on Instagram and use the tag #myIBC so we can see what you're cooking in the kitchen!
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Comments

  • Kenny at

    I always have the hardest time with bath bombs. They always fall apart. I’m going to try your recipe instead.

  • Juliana Evans at

    Yes i am totally agreed with this article and i just want say that this article is very nice and very informative article. I will make sure to be reading your blog more. Bath Bomb Boxes can increase your sale.

  • Fred at

    Wow, this recipe is the bomb! Where do you buy the moisture-free clear glass jar to store them?

  • Maria at

    I tried it and it worked pretty well, Just a quick question, may I add additional essential oil for fragrance?

    • Michael Wurm, Jr. at

      Yes, just be sure the oil isn’t an irritant to the skin.

      xo Michael

  • David Gweta at

    Your work has always been a great source of inspiration for me. I refer you blog to many of my friends as well.
    All Pakistan Drama Page

  • Lime at

    Can I use fragrance oils instead of essential oils?

  • Ariana-Jordan at

    Hey! Thanks for the awesome recipe! Can’t wait to try it. I am making bath bombs for my sister’s birthday. She happens to like bath bombs in star and heart shapes. I was wondering that since I don’t have bath bombs molds, could I let the mixture dry out in a deep pan or cookie sheet and then use cookie-cutters to cut out the shapes? I wonder if it will still hold. Thanks! Have a nice evening! – Ariana-Jordan

  • Melissa at

    I omitted the water and mica powder and used coconut oil. There’s no need to add alcohol either. My bath bombs turned out awesome the second time around! The first time I used mica powder and used to much and it started dying my skin blue. So watch how much you’re using! I saw something online about mixing mica powder with alcohol and splattering a bit of drops on top of already made bath bombs. I’m probably gonna do that instead!

    The bath bombs I made are very durable too. I accidentally dropped one on the floor and it still stayed together. Just make sure to dry yours over night! I dried mine on top of paper to help dry it out more and soak up excess oil.

  • Kelly at

    I found this recipe a couple of weeks ago, and because it’s the top google search result, I went with it. The product links didn’t work but I was still able to find the ingredients pretty easily online!

    I used ingredients and followed the instructions to a tee adding dried lavender. I used melted coconut oil and 3/4 tablespoon of wate, a d a silicone mild with 24 2” hearts.

    First I was able to perfectly fill the mild which was excellent. But the mixture was so dry and crumbly that I had to put it all back in the bowl. I had to add another 2-3 tbs of liquid to get it wet enough to stick. I used water and this caused the citric acid to activate. After pushing it back into the mild a few times they finally dried and hardened. Hopefully there’s some fizz left!

    Next time I’ll try witch hazel and I’ll say it’s not enough liquid in the recipe if you’re adding dried pedals at least. But they turned out lovely and the lavender/coconut oil scent is 🙌🏻

    Thank you for sharing this recipe! Going to try coconut rose tomorrow!!

  • Kristin LeAnn Page at

    I want to make human shaped bath bombs instead of round ones so I bought a silicone human mold. Do you have any tips for using this? Should I cut it in half so it resembles a bath bomb mold more?

  • Mary Ellen at

    This recipe is *nearly* spot-on! There is a lot of info (and many bad recipes) online for bath bombs. This post shares great insight and one of the very best recipes I’ve found. I’m giving it 5 stars because I think it deserves top place in the Google search engine, but I think it could use some small modifications.

    1) For a faster and more fool-proof recipe, use witch Hazel in a spray bottle. You can add all the “wet” ingredients (sans-water) at once and spray with WH as needed thereafter. This should be added to the instructions as an alternative option.

    2) This recipe yields (4) 2.5” diameter cylindrical bath bombs. The size of mold should be noted in the recipe itself. Having to search the blog for a LINK to the molds used is not optimal.

    Other than these two things, the recipe is perfect and I’ve used it as the base for bath bomb making on multiple occasions. Each time I come out of the bath relaxed and with my skin feeling nourished.

    Thank you!!!!!!

  • Keith at

    Love the idea I’ll definitely give that a try

  • Lisa at

    i would like to know if a different oil can be used, like Jojoba oil, since I have this on hand?

  • Becky at

    These sound great!!
    Love the idea and the DIY sounds fairly easy, I’ll definitely give that a try 🙂 ..I can already smell it in the air

  • Samantha at

    I like your variation, especially with the orange zest. I recently made some for birthday gifts for some teenage girls and they were a hit.

  • Samuel Adler at

    Hello Michael,

    Found the recipe to be very great and healthy.
    I actually get used to the usual shower gel mostly, yet I think this is going to be a new try for me and my family.

    On your word, it is going to give a relaxing bath in no time. 😀

    Can you just let me know if I can use anything else instead of baking soda?
    Wondering if it may cause some allergy issues.

  • Ronda at

    I just made them… tested leftovers in water and it sizzles wonderfully… my first bath bombs and they came out great… thanks for staring.

  • Violet at

    This recipe doesn’t work. I don’t recommend. i used all the correct ingredients and measurements and i spent 3 hours trying to make it work. don’t waste your time😡

  • Carley at

    I modified to what I had on hand, so I used gel food coloring and coconut oil, and actually cooking vanilla. I did, however, measure out the additional liquid instead of the water so it wasn’t too wet. It was probably more forgiving, because I used smaller molds, but ultimately they were adorable and fizzy in the bathtub! I’d guess this is a pretty versatile recipe and plan to try oat flour instead of cornstarch next!

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